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Arlington ISD sued over $1.2 million in unpaid Texas winter storm repairs

“My company has not been paid one penny,” Robert Jordan says.

A North Texas construction company has accused the Arlington school district for refusing to pay over $1.2 million in emergency repairs after the winter storm in February.

In a complaint filed June 28 in Tarrant County District Court, Robert Jordan Construction says it dried and dehumidified 450,000 square feet of Sam Houston High School after the school suffered widespread flooding, according to media reports.

Owner Robert Jordan aired his grievance Sept. 12 in a seven-minute video on YouTube.

“My company has not been paid one penny for the work we performed at Sam Houston,” Jordan said in the video.

But district officials say they did not enter a written contract with the company and that attorneys for the construction company have not shown that such a contract exists, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported.

The district’s attorneys also argued the district has governmental immunity from the lawsuit, according to the Star-Telegram.

Jordan told KTVT-TV (Channel 11) that Arlington ISD is requesting documentation from him that does not exist. He told the news station that he worked around the clock for a week-and-a-half to complete the work.

“It’s a big dragon that we had to slay,” he told the station. “I was pretty proud of the work we did there.”

Jordan posted the YouTube video after growing frustrated by the school district’s legal tactics, he told Channel 11. The video has been viewed more than 19,000 times.

The lawsuit is ongoing, but the district indicated in court records that it could take years to reach an agreement, according to Channel 11.

Sarah Bahari, Special Contributor. Sarah Bahari is a freelance writer covering Arlington, Irving and Grand Prairie. She previously worked as a features writer for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, where she covered a little of everything. Email her tips at sarahbahari@gmail.com.

sarahbahari@gmail.com
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